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environment that will make people want to work here. >> reporter: despite the competition, many of the visitors from japan became interested in coming to brazil. >> translator: the more i learn, the harder it seems to do business here. but i think brazil has huge potential as a market. >> reporter: the competition for labor is starting to spread into more and more rural areas in brazil. but that's unlikely to discourage japanese companies from investing in this rapidly expanding economy. nhk world. >>> let's now get another check of the market figures. >>> crews at the damaged fukushima daiichi nuclear plant in japan have started work on a project to stop highly contaminated water from escaping into the environment. tokyo electric power company workers discovered three of seven underground storage pools are leaking. tepco officials believe pools one and two may be leaking the most. so they're placing priority on draining them. on tuesday, workers started transferring about 20 tons of water per hour from pool two to an above ground tank more than 400 meters away. officials say th
of the environment. >> trauma surgeon explaining that there have been doctors in surgery since early this morning. he's been in surgery since 8:00 this morning. he's performed several surgeries on the injured victims of today's bombings. the bombings took place at approximately 2:50 p.m. local time. the trauma surgeon reporting one of his medical partners here at massachusetts general has military experience and has served in both iraq and afghanistan. the doctor describing that experience, that wartime experience as being apparently very useful today. as doctors treated some of the more than 130 people who were injured. there are many, many unanswered questions tonight. including unconfirmed reports about other potentially explosive devices. found on or near the scene of the bombings today. law enforcement officials have not confirmed that there were other unexploded bombs for lack of a less specific but more politic term. as of tonight the official confirmation is that there were two devices. only two. those were the two that caused the massive explosions. to the extent that there were other device
is above sea level rise and certainly when we talk about the environment. as the title of this panel says, along green view. it is absolutely about how the complexities of human decision making, human settlement, individual ambition, always contradictory emotions of people have shape not only what the environment is, we impact it and give them access. but how we think of it to my we formulate the idea of the wild and now often that is based on these often very self-serving tropes that we invented. so the environment is about history, human action. and in this but what i tried to do is to show how some of those crosscurrents work. he said sell thing boils down to the final decisive battle but against the indians to have been an extremely aggressive northern plains tribe who had been the ones first to master horses and had arranged absolutely right through the yellowstone country hunting in the fire all, for example. once there were dealt with the exploration could continue, but one last cautionary note goes back to the question of prison. i think it is very easy when people look at this bo
different country, we are living in a very different environment where it is no longer patriotism and love and family, it is not terrorists and hate. we have toounderstand that. we have to say we are in fact committed to our liberties and freedom, but you know, the people also deserve to be safe in their neighborhoods and homes. melissa: you think we have to figure out what to do from here, how to live differently, what should have been the indifferently for something like this not happen? >> we have many students in boston. they get here on a student visa from countries all across the world and we are happy about that but once they get here they don't return. many of them don't return and they stay here for 6 years, they marry and become permanent citizens and we don't know if these two young men from chechnya, i know what that places like. i have seen violence in belfast and all these places where i have been, as a diplomat and an ambassador. the other thing is i always -- at the marathon and walking up the street and saw hundreds and hundreds of young people walking around with backpack
to provide a very secure environment. you literally can't do it. if your standard is nobody can be at risk at a large public event, we're never going to have another u 2 concert. there are basic procedures for events like this. they're well established. we've learned from everything from the '96 olympic bombings to what you should do. are this they going to do a review? did we do the due diligence? they'll have to. it will be pretty clear whether that was done or not. and then we'll move on from there and we may learn some things to improve. we've got a pittsburgh marathon coming up, other things. you can't stop these public events. you can't make them perfectly secure, but you can do due diligence. the key point is the best way to stop these attacks is good intelligence, good police enforcement that goes out and finds the perpetrators before they do something. >> you can't protect every inch of a 26.2 mile race of course, that's for sure. james carafano, security expert in washington. thank you so much for being with us. really appreciate it. >> thanks for having me. >> reporter: thanks s
they are able to say if they were small bits of metal place there had intentionally or part of the environment. >> forensic pathologist fox news contributor dr. michael baden live this morning. what do you think? >> i think a lot of information being retrieved not only from the streets, but also from the bodies, the surgeons working on people are removing shrapnel, some of which comes from the bomb. the medical examiner's office this morning will do the autopsies on the three people that died. the first thing they will do identify the bodies but take x-rays of the bodies so they can remove any shrapnel that can be part of the bomb. but they also have two in tact bombs. >> we think. we don't really know that. >> allegedly. if indeed they do -- >> if the early reports are true. >> -- and any bomb that didn't explode there's a probe of information they can check back who made the wires. >> who bought the bags. >> what about in terms of shrapnel for lack of a better word in bodies how can that lead to anything? >> that is part of the bomb. it can telling y you where this of object was purchased, w
something. about being aware of your environment. if it looks unusual. tell something abit. a -- about it. >> best advice. don't let them affect your life. go back and live your life. >> live your life. when you compromise how you live that gives them a victory. as painful as it is to day. you can't let them succeed by us changing the norm and how we live. can't let them win. no victories. >> i think the last point is so important. you can't let them win. can't say i will not go to the ball game because of what if? that's what they want. >> that's what they want. they want you to stay home and watch this coverage and be too scared to do anything. you have to go out and live your life. important clues, for as chaotic as that look. there are important clues of behind the -- >> the injured. if anybody has hand injuries. some one could be using bomb make mag terl and residue on their hants. >> this shrapnel and things that could have come from the device itself. >> that's right. and pierre thomas is reporting what they want to see is how was it detonated, remotely detona detonated, with a cel
that only becomes more true in these environments. think about, this isn't islamabad coming online. think about what that does for education, for health. think about 5 billion new witnesses that can document atrocities that are being committed. of course there are challenges but there is a lot of good news ahead of us. >> everybody's empowered. you do a google search when you go to a doctor and instead of sitting there where the doctor is playing god -- >> has all the info -- >> you have as much info as you want going in there and a lot of doctors hate that. you can say wait a second, isn't there a possibility if you do that, this is -- we are empowered in every way from powered by a car and how we're taken care of and also democratically. i had had a political science professor who told me back in the '80s the soviets were mar for worried about a xerox machine than a cruise missile in west germany and she was right. >> the empowerment of information of people is really the way to solve almost every problem. when we went to north korea our idea was that if we could just get a little bit o
the environment of the blast, these are things that were packed into the bomb. >> i think we are still getting details of all the events that happened, and obviously it's very difficult to conclude, based on initial impressions. i won't exclude completely the possibility that some of the fragments are environmental, but my opinion is that most of them were in the bombs. >> reporter: most of the injuries were to the lower portions of the body. a possible indication of a more sophisticated, directed blast. now of the 31 people who were brought here 12 still remain. six to eight are under anesthesia at this moment. there were four amputations performed here and the doctors say for the most part these were automatic amputations, that the limbs had endured so much trauma the way one doctor described it, they just finished what the bomb had done, jon. jon: so for those who are still hospitalized how is it looking? >> reporter: the doctors won't make any promises, but they said it's looking pretty good. there are some limbs that are still at risk of amputation. also you had patients out here with a l
anything else becoming empowered to look into your environment and what we're seeing from boston, heroes is comi
? >> the average person? >> yes, absolutely. you can. >> what? >> when you go into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if the blast is from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass and severely injure or possible kill. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
of that traffic. .t causes obviously delays it has an adverse impact on the environment as well. is to expand the american plaza, but also pursue span.bridges fan -- new yorket in buffalo, we southern ontario are -- need capacity. w want emphasize that we are trying to remove barriers to access, both physical and in tolls. when you look at the situation with the peace bridge, a lot of tolls are being used to support expansion of the plaza to promote traffic between the united states and canada. this is something that would be of concern. my sense is that it would be a new agency imposed toll compared to the ones that are already in place. help iniate all of your helping us address the issues and the peace bridge connecting buffalo and southern ontario in particular. i yield that. >> thank you. i turned to the gentleman from utah. thank youecretary, for your services. this is probably a long hearing. you do not know the line of questioning, so it requires you to be an expert on everything. things i would like to ask you quickly if i could. >> sure. >> as a former air force pilot, uncomfortabl
with our reduced output so the faith is still there, that it's well run in a bad macro economic environment which comes back to mcdonald's which you have a note out today from sus can dehanna which says it is executing across the world and it is stable in its market share or gaining and it is against it. that seems to be the major theme. >> another theme that's sort of emerged in these big companies, citigroup, as well is the strength of the latin american consumer and the latin american corporation. caterpillar noting that lshg, even though china continues to be weak and there seems to be a shift from asia pacific to latin america coming from these multinationals. >> resuming the buyback does not hurt by the end of the year. it had approved for a while in '07. >> and that might be taking some of the sting out of this today. >> when we come back, yet another price target cut for apple ahead of its earnings and this time from bmo. colin gilles over at bgc is upgrading the stock this morning. which one is right? we'll hear from both analysts this morning. the dow coming off its worst week sin
and also some worries about the global growth environment. we think we may have a little bit of a pause here, but we're going to see continued growth through the year. it will be rewarded by take risk in the stock market. >> why? >> because with growth keeping up and inflation being under control, monetary policy is going to stay very easy, and we see that as being something that's going to lead to equity returns being positive. >> you have to admit, we've had a very good first quarter, 10% gains for most of the averages, 15% at the most extreme. aren't we due for a correction of some kind? >> well, we could absolutely have a pause here and a small correction wouldn't be off the realm, but without a big downturn in data or a big change in monetary policy expectations, i think it will be relative tame. >> what have you thought of the earnings so far this season? >> they've been modestly disappointing. we got some news today about corporate business jet appetite that was a little bit disappointing. but then look at the fed beige book report today, where they saw their seeing slightly impr
yan. tla there's been tough military action. you flee that environment. you come into the united states. you go to school. you get a scholarship. you have friends. but somewhere in that leadened, deadened heart, head of yours, it's still not good enough. there is a cause that's more important, not survival, and i'm not sure we'll ever be able to comprehend that. we need to try because it may give us potential to identify other people. here we have a rather remarkable journey these two young men took. a journey literally millions have taken. and they've contributed to the united states. their contribution was death and destruction. of innocent people. we may never understand, rationalize, how. >> as you reference the uncle who pleaded with his nephew, dzhokhar, give yourself up, give yourself up. and of course that is the fervent wish of law enforcement officials for a number of reasons. one is for the survival of dzhokhar tsarnaev because there is a manhunt for him and he will not escape that network of law enforcement at some point. this will not come to a good end. but also fro
to bring a little kin to the environment. here's some of what you said. r.d. copeland tweeted us, i build raw bale and ear plasr homes. can you explain what that means? >> he's got two brothers. >> i was thinking the same thing. >> we applaud him for what he's doing. >> i bet it smells goodtoo. >> another one. lindsay says her forite way to save the planet,sing cloth apers an wipes. >> i heard about that when i had my daughter. >> and then what happened? >> i think i tried it for, like, two days. >> you have to watch them. i thought the smell, and the sink is full of you know what. >> why do you hate the environment? >> willie! >> giada knows being green is a ar round deal. she's been working with ks in an elementary school in l.a. to plant a gardennd grow their own food. >> that's terrific. >> how did this come about? >> what i did in partnership with my agency is that we adopted the school i compton, californ. it's foster elementa, and there's a lot of actual kids who are foster kids in the school. what i really wanted to do tru was just allow them to have a pleasant, fun, educational e
a weaker or softish commodity environment will drive that even further and higher. >> when i see you, the one commodity which is oil, give me your take here and correct me if i'm wrong, but you've always been a big bull. >> yeah. reality is oil. we just don't have a lot of new sources for it and you really have to take the world and slam it to almost zero growth before that would really undermine the supply/demand picture for oil. oil production grows about a million, a million and a half barrels a year and demand grows about that amount and the cost structure to bring that on is now $80 to $90 a barrel and i can't say this doomsday scenario that people say the oil markets will be prone to, and if it fits in the broader picture that the global economy is doing fine, you will see oil bottoming here in the next $5, $6 a barrel and probably making close to a new high by the end of the year. so everybody understands why that's a positive, but there are some who want to read both the decline in crude and gold as, all right, we're not going to have inflation and we're also not going to hav
words of calm. a day later, how is this sinking in? >> well, i think obviously the city, the environment around the city is still in a state of shock. the city will not be business as usual today. many of the streets around us you can see have been closed off, back bay, the entire area of the finish line is closed off and shut down. but like any city like new york, after september 11th, like any city in this country, people are resilient, we'll go on. >> yesterday was a special day for people outside of boston, can you explain? >> oh, joe. >> you know, the sox play, it's a holiday in boston, actually. >> it's a holiday. >> the sox play in the afternoon. you were there with your son. >> it's a traditional holiday. it's perhaps the greatest day for the city during the course of the year. it's a day when the entire city wears a smile. it's a day when hundreds of thousands of people arrive here from literally around the globe and certainly around the nation to run, first, in the boston marathon, 26 miles in massachusetts, to the boylston finish line. the game concludes just as the middle of
that will come with this legislation. retailers have been operating in an environment where they have not been required to collect and remitt sales taxes for states where they do not have a physical presence. this legislation would change that almost in an instant. before we enact a new sales tax system we need to take into accounts the costs that will impose on businesses of all sizes and the difficulties those -- these companies will face as they adapt to the new regime. for example, there is the issue of vendor compensation. the streamlined sales and use tax agreement currently includes a provision giving states the opportunity to voluntarily compensate remote sellers -- quote -- "as a measure of good faith"-- unquote for registering to voluntarily collect and remit sales taxes into states where the seller has no physical presence. this is included in the agreement because under current law remote sellers are generally not required to collect and remit the sales tax and they incur a cost when doing so. the marketplace fairness act does not include any provision for compensation of remote se
had -- they may not have had ieds but certainly have had high stress environments that kind of mimic a conflict. i'm thinking here about parts of the inner city or what is known as the inner city, cities like -- places like compton detroit, chicago a couple of years has been off the charts, parts of d.c. back in the '80s, parts of new york. so i mean -- i think there are high stress environments that mimic conflict zones. however, again i think this was different because this was -- we ignore what happens within our inner cities, within our urban centers and then in a way we ignore what happens in other people's cities and other people's foreign centers where we are active. and i think this was one moment that was broadcast all over -- all across the nation. it was all across the world. people were watching. all of a sudden, middle class americans, people who live in places like watertown they get a taste of what other countries -- what other people, what other parts of their own country have to go through. i don't think that it's crazy to -- the vocabulary that was used was the same
't create a fail safe environment. >> reporter: investigators have swept up a large amount of potential evidence including small bomb fragments and surveillance pictures and tape but we have to say it's too early to know if this attack was a work of a terror group, domestic or foreign, or the act of a lone wolf who was inspired to act out. charlie? >> bob orr, thanks. cities around the country increased security. with us now is rudy giuliani mayor of new york city during the 9/11 attacks who consults with other cities on handling terror attacks and also john miller, nypd commissioner during mr. giuliani's tenure. a this turns the clock back to 2001. whatever the thinking was on september 12th is now the thinking today. >> it really reminds us right, of what we knew on september 11th and september 12th that the big news here is this is a horrible attack terrible attack, my heart goes out to the people that were hurt but surprising there haven't been more of these since september 11th. we expected many attacks like this. the raleally remarkable story is so many ha
ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigilant. yet it just takes one. >> listen, it does take one. certainly because it is the marathon, it is the showcase, really of the city and the state, you have all those people there anyway. thank goodness they were actually there because the first responders, the medical personnel, the tents are right there. they're able to adjust from high duration to almost like a war type of reaction, type of force to pr
within that environment. for them, had this been directly tied to have these two individuals been directly tied to those groups, i would be surprised if they didn't want to claim it. there are anti-american in a substrata of the chechen organization. host: what surprised you the most as you go through this data? guest: one of the positive surprises was the willingness of the american people and working with law enforcement and department of homeland security in a way similar to the administration strategy for preventing violent extremism. a community-oriented approach that will increase communication between the community and government, and prevent radicalization from happening in the first place, and if it does occur, allowing the government and community to deal with it in a positive way before a terrorist plot is hatched. 57% of respondents indicated a willingness to work with law enforcement and dhs to establish those relationships ahead of time. it is a positive story. i see a lot of value in a community-oriented approach towards these counter radicalization. host: national
. >> thanks, al. >>> up next, makeup that's good for you and the environment, right after this. hi, listen i think you could do better. oh no, he's a nice guy. no i'm talking abt your yogurt. see dannon oikos is so rich and thick and smooth. so smooth. in a national taste test dannon oikos fat free rawber flavor beat chobani 2 to 1. mmmm. stamos? look babe - i'm doing better. she means the yogurt. join us babe. try it for yrself. dannon oikos greek nonfat yogurt. ♪ dannon it'not a ndy bar. 130 calories 7 grams of protein the new fiber one caramel nut protein bar. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check th temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. or lasts longer. igarnier invents olia. a haircolor breakthrough. our first monia-ee permanent color, pored by oil. olia propepe color deep. pure, luminous, vivid color. visibly improves and restores hair. new olia by garnier. i'm over the hill. my bod'k the way it used to. past my prime? i'm a victim o
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
. their concern is autonomy. there are actors within that environment. for them, had this been directly tied to have these two individuals been directly tied to those groups, i would be surprised if they didn't want to claim it. there are anti-american sentiments. host: what surprised you the most as you go through this data? guest: one of the positive surprises was the willingness of the american people and working with law enforcement and department of homeland security in a way similar to the administration strategy for preventing violent extremism. a community-oriented approach that will increase community between -- communication between the community and government, and prevent radicalization from happening in the first place, and if it does occur, allowing the government and community to deal with it in a positive way before a terrorist plot is hatched. 57% of respondents indicated a willingness to work with law enforcement and dhs to establish those relationships ahead of time. positive story. i see a lot of value in a community-oriented approach towards these counter radicalization.
something. if you see somebody carrying something odd that doesn't fit in the environment, you should seek out law enforcement and bring it to their attention. >> gretchen: you say to look at the people around you. even to the point of no problem staring at them. why? >> yes. as people, we don't like to look at people. anything more than two seconds, you're scary and being rude. you know what? be rude. pay attention to who is next to you. what are they wearing? how do they look? how are they carrying themselves? look at their behaviors. what are they communicating to you not just verbally, but nonverbally. >> gretchen: know where you will evacuate. oftentimes when people get on airplanes, they'll say i'm five rows from the nearest exit. you're talking about just in general, right? >> yes. whether indoors or outdoors. this specific event, you're barricaded in in an area. you're watching the marathon go on. when you get there, assess. if something happens, i want two ways out. if something happens on this side, i will go out this way. if something happens on this side, i will go out that way
control. the environment is okay. at this point we're not seeing any chemicals released into the air and they don't believe that's going to occur. >> sergeant swanton, we appreciate your time. : >> good morning again. >> good morning again. good to see you. yes, unfortunately, we do have some very strong storms that are starting to impact the city of west and there was a special weather statement issued by the national weather service. basically this is a special statement describing the conditions that are expected with this line of storms that are impacting this region and basically they're staying that wind shift should be occurring now. so we've been talk being the wind being out of the south and eventually shifting from the northwest that. is expected to be occurring now as a line of storms is headed east. this is all associated with a strong cold front. behind it, we should also see a temperature drop. otherwise they're expecting gusts of up to 45 miles per hour with these storms. there is a chance that we could see some pea size hail, frequent cloud to ground lightning and hea
's eve, we do that in a very controlled environment. but in a marathon, we have 26 miles. >> brian: it's impossible, isn't it? >> steve: everybody has one. >> brian: but you can secure the finish line, or major points, the start or finish. do you feel confident about that? >> well, it depends. it's a big open area. you have thousands of people who are running. they're bringing their own clothing. usually what happens is they'll take some -- whatever they wear to the start of the race. they'll take that, put it in the vehicle. it's transported to the finish line. it's difficult to control. there is no easy answers, no guarantees, that's for sure. >> gretchen: when this first happened, i think a lot of people thought about new york city and 9-11, of course. but one of the things i thought a lot about was all the attacks that you thwarted. so how do you continue to be so successful at that, because there is so much discussion about it only takes one. >> right. they only have to be successful once. >> gretchen: how do you continue to be successful in new york? >> if we have some luck and w
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)